Monday, July 29, 2013

Yahoo Mail

So I was forcibly migrated into the new version of Yahoo Mail, which is so manifestly inferior to the old version that it's driving me crazy. I am seriously looking at the possibility of abandoning it and using another email service. Anyone else have similar complaints or suggestions for a good replacement?

4 comments:

Anam Cara said...

I've had aol since we first got Internet in 1995. Also had gmail and yahoo/y mail for various extra things (and a verizon account when we used them for Internet). I still like aol the best.

Anam Cara said...

I've had aol since we first got Internet in 1995. Also had gmail and yahoo/y mail for various extra things (and a verizon account when we used them for Internet). I still like aol the best.

Chris Jones said...

I use both Yahoo Mail and GMail (from Google). We have a "family" e-mail account on Yahoo and I have a personal e-mail account on GMail.

Of the two, I prefer GMail; but it has to be said that Google, like Yahoo, will update their e-mail software with what they think of as "improvements" but not all users agree that the changes are for the better.

When considering what to do about e-mail, it's important to distinguish between the e-mail service and the e-mail software that you use to access your e-mail. These two distinct items are often packaged together; Yahoo Mail provides both an e-mail service and the browser-based software you use to read and send e-mail. The "new version" that has you so riled up is a new version of the client software; the back-end e-mail service probably hasn't changed at all.

The reason I bring this up is that you don't have to use Yahoo's client software to access your Yahoo mail. You can use just about any stand-alone e-mail client you like. The Thunderbird e-mail client (from the folks who made the Firefox browser) is an excellent one; and some folks like Microsoft Outlook. Either one of these can be configured to use Yahoo's mail server as a back end. And there are lots of others.

Rather than switch to a different mail service and use that service's web-based mail client (and thus be at their mercy whenever they choose to "improve" their client), you can shop around for e-mail client software that you like, and wire it up to your existing Yahoo account.

There is a good post on Lifehacker (here) that lays all of this out.

John Meese said...

I like Gmail. After Orthodoxy, Liberty, personal growth, and Bitcoin, I probably talk about why I like Google the most. So I'm biased in already liking Google, but I've never had trouble with Gmail (almost ten years using it).